Adisaptagram – an ancient port town in Bengal

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Currently there is a railway station by the name of Adisaptagram in the Howrah-Burdwan main line which indicates the township of Saptagram. One of the most important remnants which still exists today is a brick mosque protected by the Archaeological Survey of India. The roof has collapsed . There are rich terracotta decorations on the exterior walls and on the three Mihrabs and corner Minarets .There is a stone foundation plaque which states that the Mosque was constructed by Syed Jamaluddin , the son of Abul Syed Fakuruddin of Amul during the Ramzan month circa 936 Hizira(1529 AD).

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Amkhoi Fossil Park

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The angiosperm wood fossils which are displayed here were collected during pond digging from Amkhoi village of Illambazar Forest, Birbhum District. These specimens are definite proof of the presence of a vast dry deciduous forest with a few evergreen elements in this area, which prevailed 15 to 20 million years before present (Late Miocene). Wood fossils can also be found in different places of Birbhum, Bardhaman, Bankura and Medinipur Districts of West Bengal as well as in Mayurbhanj District in Orissa.

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Sukharia – the land of the Mitra Mustafis

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The village of Sukharia is associated with the Mitra Mustafi family whose other settlements were in the villages of Ula Birnagar and Sripur. The Mitra Mustafi family is sometimes called the family of Dewans as most of the family members served in different positions in the revenue departments during the rule of the monarchy.

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Bhalkimachan – the royal bear hunting grounds

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The Zamindars and the royal family members of Burdwan used this place as a hunting spot and constructed several Machans for their convenience. Thus Bhalki and Machan combined to give the place its current name Bhalki Machan. The etymology can be broken down into Bhalu ki Machan. Bhalu means bear. Machan means an elevated resting place for the hunters to hunt down wild animals.

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Khana Mihirer Dhipi

Chandraketugarh – a tryst with the mystical ancient history

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When king Chandraketu was ruling the kingdom, a Pir named Gorachand arrived from Arab and tried to convince the king to convert his religion to Islam. During that time, he showed several magical tricks. One of the tricks was that he bloomed Champa flower during off season on the Bera (fence). From that time, the place is called Berachampa.

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