Summer Road Trip – Badrinath Bound

A 0445 hrs start on our drive to Joshimath gives us ample time to stop for birding and halts at scenic places to take in the enigmatic majesty of the Himalayas.

Plum headed Parakeet

Plum headed Parakeet

Satpuli is one such place which is spread out in the valley below looking absolutely enchanting in the morning light. It is said that Satpuli got its name from the fact that it has seven bridges (‘sat pul’) on its way from Kotdwar.

Satpuli

Satpuli

Moving on… the road gets narrower and climbs higher taking us to Paudi and then to Shrinagar, it’s a lonesome stretch where we go for tens of kilometres without sighting a soul!

Shrinagar

Shrinagar

Shrinagar is located in a wide and beautiful valley with the Alaknanda gently meandering below. It is a bustling cantonment town and also the point where we join the regular yatra route making for extremely long lines of vehicles going up towards Kedarnath/Badrinath. At points we are barely crawling along… tiresome really!

Lunch is at Karnaprayag and we look for the sangam there in vain! I am positive there is one ….! Only on ascending the road further towards Joshimath do we see it. The beautiful green waters of the Pindar merging with the frantic turbulence of the Alaknanda! A beautiful sight indeed!

The Pindar just before the sangam at Karnaprayag

The Pindar just before the sangam at Karnaprayag

Nandaprayag

Nandaprayag

We make Joshimath quite uneventfully that evening. Jyotirmath, also known as Joshimath is a city in Chamoli District in Uttarakhand. Located at a height of 6150 feet, it is a gateway to several Himalayan mountain climbing expeditions, trekking trails and pilgrim centres like Badrinath. It is home to one of the four cardinal pīthas established by Adi Shankaracharya. We settle in early for the night in anticipation of the next day’s outing to Badrinath!

View from Joshimath

View from Joshimath

The gate system being eliminated this year… we have the luxury of starting out after breakfast. By 0700 hrs we are on our way to Badrinath. Govindghat, Pandukeshwar, Hanuman Chatti…. it is wonderful to finally see the places one has only read about and plotted on maps prior to the trip. These are lovely little settlements along the river, each with their own set of legends attached. Govindghat of course, the gateway to Hemkund Sahib and the Valley of Flowers.

View in Govindghat

View in Govindghat

The Alaknanda river alongside the road

The Alaknanda river alongside the road

Pandukeshwar, legend has it that the Pandavas spent their exile here. A bright splash of orange in an otherwise brown and green landscape, Hanuman Chatti has a predictable saffron coloured temple dedicated to (who else??) Lord Hanuman.

Hanuman Chatti

Hanuman Chatti

Right after Hanuman Chatti starts the steep, sharply winding and dusty part of the route. Negotiating that part needs intense concentration since the visibility is barely a few metres due to the dust kicked up by the vehicle ahead. This route has enormous numbers of trucks carrying construction material and large Volvos packed with pilgrims plying alongside the usual Taveras, Innovas, Sumos and an assortment of other cars. Additionally, the road is potholed, and intermittently swamped by small rivulets of icy water from the snow melt higher up.

Dusty roads

Dusty roads

Icy rivulets cascading across the road

Icy rivulets cascading across the road

The first glimpse of Badrinath is mesmerising!! It is nestled between the Nar and Narayan ranges. The towering Neelkanth lies just behind the Narayan Parvat on which the Badrinath shrine has been built. In the pristine morning sunlight and the crystal clear visibility of this place, this brilliant megalith has a strange magnetism. I think everyone who visits this place must be a little bit under its spell.

Neelkanth

Neelkanth

The little settlement haphazardly built around the temple is but a random patchwork of colours in a vast magnificent landscape meant to command… dominate… enthral… hypnotise… inspire… all at once!

The lofty snow capped peaks in the backdrop of the gurgling Alaknanda far below … this is the place which has so much spirituality that you can almost reach out and touch it. Nothing is godlier than nature itself!
It really puts things into perspective. One senses how small, insignificant and petty are human egos, wants and conflicts in a scale this extravagant. It is at once uplifting and calming… a place I felt at peace with myself and the world at large. The Himalayas in their splendorous beauty! I’ll let the pictures do the talking…

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Badrinath Temple

Badrinath Temple

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After Badrinath (which is chaotic in the extreme for parking, darshan!!) we proceed to Mana, the last village on the frontier. Parking woes follow us here too. We park half a mile away and walk up to the village albeit with some reluctance at seeing the enormous crowds going both up and down.

The last Indian village before the China border - Mana

The last Indian village before the China border – Mana

Across the river on the other bank are many small fields freshly ploughed. We notice what look like pigeons flocking there except that they are oddly coloured. Realisation dawns on us that we are looking at 150 to 200 worth flocks of Snow Pigeons!! What a sight!

Snow Pigeons foraging

Snow Pigeons foraging

Snow Pigeon flock in flight

Snow Pigeon flock in flight

Walking up towards the famed Vyas and Ganapati Gufas as well as the Bhim Pul, our attention is caught by a pink browed Rosefinch perched deep in the branches of a flowering tree. He doesn’t seem particularly perturbed by the human presence but refuses to come out in the open either. The Rock Bunting, the Yellow billed Choughs and numerous Rosefinches keep us company all along.

Blossoms of a flowering tree at Mana

Blossoms of a flowering tree at Mana

Pink browed Rosefinch

Pink browed Rosefinch

Rock Bunting

Rock Bunting

Himalayan Griffon

Himalayan Griffon

At one point, there is a fork in the path the left one leading almost level and then descending slightly and the right one ascending. Since there is no obvious signage (the board has fallen down as we later get to know), I ask a young lady with two little kids walking towards us on the left fork where do the two paths lead. Her answer has us in splits and I marvel at the simple pleasures of conversations with strangers one is never likely to meet but leave an indelible mark on us for life! She says, “ Upar jaiye to Vyas aur Ganapati Gufa hain aur niche jaiye to Maa Saraswati aur Bhim Pul. Himmat hai to pul ke us paar jannat ka raasta hai aur nahi to wapas parking mein apni gaadi hai.” An accurate description and a great sense of humour!!

Doing the Ganesh and Vyas Gufas and the Bhim pul circuit the other way round, we take the fork towards Bhim pul and the sacred river Saraswati. On the path leading to Bhim Pul is a Naga Sadhu seated in a shallow little cave along the sidewalk. There is a mini-traffic jam on the narrow path as the pilgrims are jostling to take his blessings and others who just want to get a good picture of this ascetic.

The Naga Sadhu

The Naga Sadhu

The spectacle of the gushing waters of the Saraswati cascading down from under the Bhim Pul and then just as suddenly, forming a calm pool below is awe-inspiring! There is a temple dedicated to ‘Maa Saraswati’ near the river. The fine spray from the fall forms a lovely little rainbow which sparkles in the sunlight lending an ethereal feel to the place.

Bhim Pul

Bhim Pul

The rainbow at the Bhim Pul

The rainbow at the Bhim Pul

According to legend, the second Pandav Bhim placed the enormous boulder across the gorge to form the ‘Bhim-pul’ so the Pandavs could cross the gushing Saraswati. Proof offered of the authenticity of this tale is that this boulder is chemically absolutely different from the mountains on either side of the gorge where this torrent surges out of. Therefore, it must have been placed there by someone sourcing it from elsewhere. Mythologically, the Pandavas crossed the Saraswati (via the Bhim Pul) and ascended to heaven… Certainly feels ‘heavenly’ enough to stay here forever!

We climb up a pretty steep path to the Maharishi Vyas Gufa where a panditji is narrating the story of Maharishi Ved Vyas and how he seeks the help of Lord Brahma to write the Mahabharat. Lord Brahma in turn requests Lord Ganesh, the divine scribe to help the Maharishi. Before commencing, Lord Ganesh says he will write on condition that the narrative is without a break. To which the Maharishi says that Lord Ganesh should write only if he understands the absolute meaning. This settled, Maharishi Ved Vyas narrates the Mahabharat to Lord Ganesh who takes on the job of a writer to pen it down. A few metres below the Vyas Gufa on a sharply descending trail is the Ganapati Gufa.

Looking back towards Badrinath from Vyas Gufa

Looking back towards Badrinath from Vyas Gufa

The darshans done, we decide to head back to Badrinath. Just short, we see many cab drivers having lunch at a tiny store selling soft drinks and chips. The owner is the cook, attendant, cleaner, steward and shopkeeper rolled into one. The cab drivers and the store owners seem amused that a middle-class looking family is willing to partake of the simple food here rather than go to one of the more pretentious stalls with menus and proper seating. The owner serves only Kadhi-chawal, some green leafy vegetable and hot garlic-red chilli chutney. We halt for lunch and have what proves to be one of the best meals of the trip! Lip smacking, delicious home cooked food!!
The journey back is without incident except for a small rock fall near Vishnuprayag. Looking up we see a herd of Ibex grazing on the slopes above causing small stones and loose mud to slide down.

Ibex

Ibex

Back from one of the most awe-inspiring and spectacular locations on earth. Truly, the ‘Abode of the Gods!’

17 Comments

  • Hi,

    ??????? – ‘Ashadharan’ – extraordinary post.

    This is one such place, I wish to be there and it’s pending since Y 2000.
    When did you go there, this year? It must have changed a lot after 16th of June and the journey to that part of the world may take some time to resume, I believe – so I would have to wait.

    You have a good hand in photography and very knowledgeable person on Birds. By the way which camera do you possess. Is this an apple tree? (Picture with caption “Blossoms of a flowering tree at Mana”)

    Brilliant writing.

  • Vipin says:

    Wow, Naturebuff Ji…a brilliant account of a place which has be penned down on ghumakkar many a times…but this one was pretty different from a birder’s perspective…you’ve beautifully & briefly covered the places that you get to see enroute… your way of expression is pretty impressive so is your photography, both keeps the reader glued. This post also helps someone who is interested in birding…at times you go to such places and captures these colourful birds…but you don’t know the names etc…through your various posts (which focuses on birding), one can not only learn about the birds, but their habitat as well, kudos for this wonderful effort!

    You are true when you say “nothing is godlier than nature itself”, the real beauty lies beyond Badrinath…like others i too tried my hand at penning down my footloose journey exploring some little known gems of this himalayn land covering Mana & beyond…you can relish it here if time allows… http://www.ghumakkar.com/2012/11/18/%E0%A4%97%E0%A4%A2%E0%A4%BC%E0%A4%B5%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%B2-%E0%A4%98%E0%A5%81%E0%A4%AE%E0%A4%95%E0%A5%8D%E0%A4%95%E0%A4%A1%E0%A5%80-%E0%A4%AC%E0%A4%A6%E0%A5%8D%E0%A4%B0%E0%A5%80%E0%A4%A8%E0%A4%BE/

  • Sandeep Gupta says:

    WOW!
    Sandeep.

  • injamaven says:

    apple blossoms

  • Naturebuff says:

    Thanks Amitava, Vipin, Sandeep and Injamaven for your comments!

    We went this year in the last week of May. It may be at least a year before the routes are opened again properly I think.

    Thanks for the compliments on my pictures… Love capturing birds and scenes for posterity! I have a Sony HX 100v. And yes, it is an apple tree.

    Vipin, I read your post and you’ll find the comments there…

    Cheers!

    • chartered sharma says:

      M planning a trip to shri Badrinath ji @ mid of november before closing of the shrine

      my route assumptions are as follow

      DAY 1 starting at 5 :am from delhi to srinagar or to joshimat if i could make it,,night stay there

      DAY 2 departure after having breakfast at around 8 :am towards shri Badrinath ji & covering mana village and caves ,lastly stay there

      DAY 3 departure from badrinath towards srinagar.. hope i make it

      DAY 4 srinagar to delhi

      my questions are

      1 ) I have experience of driving in hills have gone to LANDSDOWNE, NANITAL,KATRA, MUSSORIE. ,i wanna know will it be easy for me to drive in such TRACHEROUS roads?

      2) AM taking my own car HYUNDAI I10 1.1 engine small hatchback and we are 5 adults will it be ok for a car 68 BHP to climb at such a great height AS CALCULATED LOAD on car will be around 370-380 kg with bags and permissible weight is 435 kg..please throw some light as this is the main question
      3) DO i need to UPLIFT my car so as to gain height..i never did while on any trip in past…

      Thanks a Ton.!

      C.A VAIBHAV SHARMA

      • Naturebuff says:

        Roads condition is (was) good and your experience appears to be adequate for the hilly terrain. Delhi to Joshimath would be excessive considering the Car and the Load. Srinagar appears to be the best bet.

        Your car engine will be strained a bit considering the load. However, if the car has done Katra in the same configuration, Joshimath will be scalable.

        You need not UPLIFT your car if you slow down on bouncy patches.

        Have a nice and safe trip….

  • nirdesh singh says:

    Hi, another brilliant piece of writing with pretty photos.

    The rainbow at Bhim Pul is a catch.

    Are you shooting the birds in manual mode since the background is defocussed or using the background defocus option in automatic scenes?

  • Naturebuff says:

    Hi Nirdesh,

    The birds are shot in either superior auto if they are in the open and camera can focus on them clearly. Otherwise, and for most of the timeI shoot them in P mode with spot focus. Otherwise the focus tends to go on bright leaves or elsewhere… not a bird unfortunately!

    I’m glad you liked the post. Thank you!

  • Nandan Jha says:

    This one was a winner. The photos and text are competing with each other. At times, as a reader it is difficult to make out whether one should praise this log for the text-worthiness or for the simply brilliant shots. Wow.

    Yes, the traffic jams, the general chaos and the complete civic-neglect (from authorities as well pilgrims like us) make the whole thing much more difficult. Even after all this, everyone comes back with a super-special feeling I wonder what would happen if we remove these operational obstacles. If we take good care of Himalayas, it would take good care of us. Hopefully when the systems comes back again, we learn to respect it more.

    Thank you Naturebuff for taking all of us on this special ride.

  • Thanks Naturebuff Ji for sharing brilliant piece of writing with excellent photos.
    This is just a marvel..

  • Naturebuff says:

    Hi Nandan and Naresh,

    Nandan, I love your ‘super-special feeling’ comment. This is exactly how I felt! I thank you all for being so encouraging…

    Regards

  • Snig Bhaumik says:

    Just awesome narration.

  • Abheeruchi says:

    Hi ,

    Very nice post with beautiful pictures.This is the place I am dying to visit , I am really not sure when I will get my turn.

    Keep travelling, keep writing

  • hi
    ??? ???? ????? ???????? ??? ?? ??? ?? ?? ???? ??????? ?? ????? ????? ???? ???? ???
    ???? – ???? ???? ??????? ??? ?? ????? ?????? ?? ???

  • Naturebuff says:

    Thank you Kamlansh Rastogi for your very kind comment. I completely agree with you that I felt a sense of peace even in the midst of the milling crowds in Badrinath. The place is steeped in spirituality!! A balm for the tired urban soul!

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