Udaipur

Unlike its desert counterparts in Rajasthan, Udaipur is situated in the forested, hilly region of Aravalli Ranges in complete contrast to the arid deserts in the northwest. The city of lakes is set on the banks of freshwater lakes, the Pichola, Fatehsagar, Doodh Talai and Swaroopsagar. Lake Pichola, the largest and the most beautiful of Udaipurs Lakes is surrounded by hills, white palaces, mansions, bathing ghats, gardens and temples. Jag Mahal and Jag Niwas are the two island palaces that add to the lake’s romantic ambience. A boat ride in the evening to the island where Jag Niwas is situated promises to be a mesmerising experience and the view of Uadaipur reflected in the lake at night in all its splendour will leave you spell bound. City Palace is a magnificent and awe inspiring citadel that hosts a ‘Mewar Light & Sound Show’ every evening. Jagdish Temple, Bharatiya Lok Kala Museum, Pratap Smarak, Nehru Park, Saheliyon ki Bari, Gulab Bagh and the Monsoon Palace are other places to visit. Udaipur is connected by air and has a wide network of roads and railway services connecting it to major cities of India.

Best time to visit: October to March

Languages spoken: Mewari, Hindi, English

Climate: Hot and dry summers and cold sometimes freezing winters

Heritage Sites and Holy places: Jag Mahal, Jag Niwas, City Palace, Jagdish Temple, Pratap Smarak, Monsoon Palace

Parks and Knowledge Centres: Nehru Park, Saheliyon ki Bari, Gulab Bagh, Bharatiya Lok Kala Museum, City Palace Museum, ‘Mewar Light & Sound Show’ at City palace

5. Naggar (HP) and road back home via Chandigarh-Rothak-Ajmer-Ahmedabad-Mumbai

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Had it not been for the book, Outlook Traveller Gateways (on HP), Naggar would not have happened. Books are still much much superior as compared to host of blogs and websites. Online forums, at best, are good for an “occasional tip” and that too happens cause people speak about the content which is quite recent. Books need to re-published. The Outlook Traveller Gateways (on HP) which I referred to was published in 2008 and two years down the line nothing much had changed….

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